Wrong Recipe For Heart Disease: Stay Alert

A new study from the University of South Australia implies high-heat caramelization of flesh could be harmful to our health.

The research performed in cooperation with the Gyeongsang National University found that eating red and processed flesh improved a protein compound that may heighten the risk of heart disease, attack, and intricacies in diabetes.

UniSA researcher Dr Permal Deo tells the study delivers significant dietary insights for the community at danger of such degenerative disorders.

‘When red meat is cooked at high condition, such as grilling, roasting or frying, it develops compounds named advanced glycation end products or AGEs which when eaten, can amass
in your body and deter with ordinary cell functions,’ Dr Deo said.

‘Consumption of high-AGE nutrition can heighten our total day-to-day AGE input by 25 per cent, with increased levels providing to vascular and myocardial stiffening, inflammation and oxidative stress – all signs of degenerative disorder,’ added Dr Deo.

The research, announced in Nutrients, assessed the consequences of two diets – one high in red meat and refined grains and the other high in whole grains dairy, nuts & legumes,& and white meat using steaming, boiling, stewing & parboil cooking techniques.

It found that the food high in red meat considerably improved AGE levels in blood implying it may contribute to infection progression

Primarily preventable, cardiovascular disorder (CVD) is the number one factor of death globally. In Australia, it exemplifies one in five of all demises.

Co-researcher UniSA’s Professor Peter Clifton explains while there are still topics about how dietary AGEs are associated with a chronic disorder, this study shows that consuming red meat will modify AGE levels.

‘The meaning is pretty clear: if we need to reduce heart disease danger, we wish to cut back on how extensively red meat we eat or be more deemed about how we cook it. Frying, grilling and searing may be the choice of top cooks, but this might not be the reasonable choice for a community staring to cut their risk of disease,’ said Dr Deo.

‘If you wish to decrease your risk of surplus AGEs, then slow-cooked dinners could be a better alternative for long-term fitness,’ added Dr Deo.

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